Saturday, January 14, 2017

Fake Ass Jeans



ans"





From February 17, 2014, that's "Fake Ass Jeans."  C.I. noted:

Barack explains, "I'm using this Presidents Day to unveil my new Fake Ass Jeans.  Maybe as Reporters Without Borders points out, you're trying to destroy journalism or maybe you support illegal spying but try to pretend otherwise.  Just slip on my Fake Ass Jeans and you can be a Fake Ass too!"  Valerie Jarrett exclaims, "Fake Ass Jeans! Oh, the smell of it!" Isaiah archives his comics at The World Today Just Nuts.

Valerie Jarrett really did become my favorite character in the administration.

I don't know why everyone pretended Barack was so cool.

He was a dull, middle-aged father as a person -- one who clearly wished he hadn't failed at having a son.

He was a War Hawk on foreign policy.

And he did nothing to help the economy or the lives of African-Americans.

Fake Ass?

That's his entire two terms.

Here's C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot:"


Friday, January 13, 2017.  Chaos and violence continue, the Canadian government won't answer to whether or not their soldiers receiving treatment in Iraq were injured in battle, when do we ever arrive at what passes for 'victory' and much more.


More and more, I think what any occupant of the White House needs is a car with twin 11-year-olds in the backseat, bored, hopped up on Monster and kicking the seat in front of them while repeatedly asking, "Are we there yet?  Are we there yet?"

Are we there yet?

That's one of the most important questions that president-elect Donald Trump will face once he's sworn in as President of the United States.

And someone needs desperately to define where ''there" is.

The Iraq War, or at least this century's installment, started in March of 2003.

Two months shy of 14 years, the war continues and US troops are still engaged in it -- from the air and on the ground.

As a point of reference, WWI and WWII did not last as long -- did not last as long combined.

Yet still the Iraq War continues.

Erik Gustafson (THE HILL) offers four things to remember regarding Iraq.


1) Victory in Mosul does not mean the ISIS threat is over.
2) Young democracies like Iraq are not the place for strongmen.
3) Reconstruction must address the longterm needs of the Iraqi people.
4) Iraq's ability to secure its future is limited by serious economic shortcomings.


A fifth?

Maybe . . . don't take your eyes off Iraq?  Don't ignore it?





Terrorism in Iraq gets far less attention, but Iraq was the site of the deadliest terrorist attack in 2016.







Yep, it does get less attention.

Why is that, Kenny boy?

Because you used your Twitter feed to campaign for Hillary Clinton?

I'm sorry, I thought Human Rights Watch was politically neutral.

Had you just focused on Iraq, maybe it would get the attention it needs.

Had you just Tweeted about HRW's Iraq reports, it might have gotten attention.

But before the election you thought you were slyly promoting Hillary and post-election you've had a tantrum or two.

Maybe if you'd focus on human rights and the work of HRW, Iraq could get the attention it deserves.

If you're part of the problem, that's on you.

So maybe we could also try to avoid dumb assery as well?


The Isis campaign against Iraq’s Shia Muslims is not politics. It’s genocide | Ranj Alaaldin







That's dumb assery.

At best, that's dumb assery.

The Islamic State is a terrorist organization.


As we've long noted, it is not the problem.

The issues in Iraq that allowed it to take root are the problem.

Destroy ISIS today and something will quickly replace it.

I'm not in the mood to be nice about this.

I warned it was coming over and over, day after day and week after week while 'smart' people either ignored what was coming or insisted everything was fine.

Sunnis are persecuted in Iraq.

Stop persecuting them.

Long before the Islamic State took root we were the only ones, here at this website, just us, pointing out the very strange issue around prison breaks: Prisoners weren't being caught.

Why not?

Because they were usually Sunni and the local residents protected and hid them.

Why?

Because of the persecution taking place in Iraq.

It was so bad that escapees could be hidden.

The Islamic State wanted power -- somewhere, anywhere.

They made Iraq a focus because Sunnis were persecuted.

And that's why they either got support from Sunnis or the Sunni reaction was: This is between the government that persecutes us and ISIS, it's not my battle.

If you missed that sentiment, you missed a whole lot.

And if you can't acknowledge it today, you are a dumb ass contributing dumb assery and no one really needs you at this point.


Maya Mailer (INDEPENDENT) reports:


“Isis is like a mushroom. It was able to grow here, in Iraq, because there is a fertile environment. It didn’t just come from nowhere.” That is what one Iraqi activist told me, with an edge of anger and passion in her voice, when I was in Iraq late last year. She went on to say that Isis could not be – and should not be – eradicated through bombs and fighting. Instead, Iraq desperately needed to embark on a national programme of reconciliation and reform.
“Isis is like a mushroom. It was able to grow here, in Iraq, because there is a fertile environment. It didn’t just come from nowhere.” That is what one Iraqi activist told me, with an edge of anger and passion in her voice, when I was in Iraq late last year. She went on to say that Isis could not be – and should not be – eradicated through bombs and fighting. Instead, Iraq desperately needed to embark on a national programme of reconciliation and reform.


If that's shocking or surprising to you, then let me join you in shock and surprise.

Where the hell have you been?

June 19, 2014, even President Barack Obama stated that the only solution to Iraq's crises was a political solution.


He said that.

And then did nothing to help there.

He started dropping bombs on Iraq.

He put "boots on the ground."

He surged the military.

He just didn't surge the diplomacy.

For the record, it's the same failure Bully Boy Bush made earlier.

Also for the record, we repeatedly made that point throughout 2014 and 2015 and 2016.

But nothing was done.

And there's no reconciliation in Iraq still.

There's no effort to end the persecution.

So defeat ISIS with the military and you haven't defeated anything.

They'll regroup or something else will replace them.

The Mosul slog continues.

It's 88 days since the operation began.

Mosul was seized by the Islamic State in June of 2014.

88 days ago, the liberation or 'liberation' effort began.

The International Organization of Migration notes:

Nearly 13 weeks into the Mosul military operation against the Islamic State (ISIL) – which began on 17 October – over 144,500 Iraqis are currently displaced. The majority are in desperate need of life-saving humanitarian assistance, especially in the cold winter weather and rain.

According to IOM Iraq’s Displaced Tracking Matrix (DTM) the displacement count from 17 October through 12 January stands at 144,588 people. The latest Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) Emergency Tracking figures on displacement from Mosul operations are available at: http://iraqdtm.iom.int/EmergencyTracking.aspx


This is what success looks like?


THE CANADIAN PRESS reports:

National Defence is refusing to disclose details about several Canadian soldiers treated at a military hospital in northern Iraq in recent weeks, including whether any of them were wounded on the battlefield.
The soldiers were among 120 patients who were seen at the medical facility since it began operating near the Kurdish city of Erbil at the end of November, according to figures provided to The Canadian Press.

Again, the question, this is what success looks like?


This morning, the US Defense Dept announced:


Strikes in Iraq
Attack, bomber and fighter aircraft and rocket artillery conducted eight strikes in Iraq, coordinated with and in support of Iraq’s government:

-- Near Haditha, a strike engaged an ISIL tactical unit.

-- Near Mosul, nine strikes engaged five ISIL tactical units; destroyed five vehicles, three mortar systems, two unmanned aircraft launch sites, three fighting positions, a rocket-propelled grenade launcher, a vehicle bomb manufacturing and armoring facility, a heavy machine gun, a supply cache and an anti-air artillery system; and damaged 18 supply routes and two bridges.

-- Near Rawah, a strike engaged an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed a vehicle, a command-and-control node and a weapons storage facility.

-- Near Sinjar, a strike destroyed a mortar system.

-- Near Tal Afar, three strikes destroyed a vehicle, a vehicle bomb facility and an unmanned aircraft launch site.


Task force officials define a strike as one or more kinetic events that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative, effect. Therefore, officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIL vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against buildings, vehicles and weapon systems in a compound, for example, having the cumulative effect of making those targets harder or impossible for ISIL to use. Accordingly, officials said, they do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target. Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike.



It's past time someone in charge was able to answer the question of "Are we there yet?" with something more than "Not yet."


The following community sites updated:




















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    Friday, December 23, 2016

    Success





     From February 10, 2014, that's "Success."  C.I. noted:

    As Iraqis are terrorized by Nouri's bombs in the background, Barack declares, "But this is what success looks like:  an Iraq that provides no safe haven to terrorists; a democratic Iraq that is sovereign and stable and self-reliant."  Isaiah archives his comics at The World Today Just Nuts.

    No one noticed for weeks after this went up but I didn't finish my signature.

    That was an accident.  :D 

    Community member Micah e-mailed me three or four weeks after it went up.  I didn't even notice that I hadn't finished it.  

    By the way, that comic could run today and it would still be accurate.



    Here's C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot:"


    Friday, December 23, 2016.  Chaos and violence continue, the Mosul slog continues . . .


    The Iraq War was illegal.  It was based on lies.  It was supported by Bully Boy Bush, Hillary Clinton, Dick Cheney, John Kerry, Harry Reid, the US media and so many more.

    Iraq did not have Weapons of Mass Destruction.

    Then the post-justifcations became (a) Saddam Hussein (ruler of Iraq) was a 'bad man' and (b) democracy will bloom in Iraq.

    That really hasn't happened.

    Former Iraqi MP and Shiite Scholar Ayad Jamal Al-Din: I Used to Call for Democracy, Now I Wish for a Dictator like Saddam




    Transcript of the above for those with streaming issues:


    There is a single Islamic rhetoric.  Sunni, Shi'ite, the Muslim Brotherhood, the Dawa Party -- all the Islamic rhetoric is the same.  It's clearest manifestation is that of ISIS.  With ISIS, it is unsweetened, unvarnished.  The leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood an the Dawa Party appear with red silk neckties, talk their way around it, fabricate a little.  But in essence, they are the same.  They are against democracy and against human rights. Someone who tells you that there is an Islamic party that believes in human rights is either a liar or an ignoramus.  No Islamic party believes in human rights.  Human rights mean that an atheist and a polytheist are equal to sayyid Al-Sistani and the Sunni source of authority and they have the same rights and the same duties.  This is not just our problem.  It is the problem of the entire region and of the Islamic world: You can either have a dictatorship with security or a democracy with disintegration.  Saddam was a dictator and the country had all the security of a grave. The minute Saddam was gone, they all wanted to take his place.  We now have 20 Shi'ite Saddams, 30 Sunni Saddams, and 40 Kurdish ones.  The country has disintegrated.  It's gone.  We want democracy with security, freedom with security, not with anarchy, militias, slaughter, killing, corruption, and the plundering of the budget.  The Arab countries that have security and stability are all ruled by a dictator.  Let me tell you, I used to preach for democracy, but after witnessing all the catastrophes I have witnessed, I wish we would get a dictator like Saddam.  At least he would protect people's lives.  Saddam was a killer, but it was just him.  Now we have 10,000 Saddams doing the killing.


    Let's drop back to March 2, 2010 for context on Ayad Jamal Aldin:


    KPCC offers another report from Quil Lawrence which includes:

    The race even includes a prominent cleric running with his own strictly secular party. Ayad Jamal al-Din studied at the world's most famous Shiite religious schools in Najaf and the Iranian city of Qom. The black turban he wears indicates that his family descends directly from the Prophet Muhammad. But Jamal al-Din says this doesn't mean he wants an Islamic state.
    Iran and the theocracy there have hijacked the Shiite turban, he says, adding that he believes the vast majority -- even among clerics -- thinks that Iranian-style government has been a failure. What people in Iraq want is very simple, he says.
    "The Iraqi on the street wants security and services. [He] does not think of a secular or religious government, just services and security," Jamal al-Din says.


    Ayad Jamal Aldin is the leader of the Ahrar Party and their most recent press release was:

    At the start of a week that has been dominated by news of the continuing and expanding 'de-Baathification' programme, Ahrar 374 Leader Ayad Jamal Aldin noted that the issue continues to distract voters' attention from the Maliki government's failure to deliver on jobs, public services and security. He urged voters to send the government a message and participate in Sunday's election.

    De-Baathification is intensifying. Over the past five days, professors at the University of Karbala and Iraq's Southern Oil Company have been targeted. The level of fear-mongering has reached such a fever pitch that large numbers of highly competent professionals that Iraq desperately needs to run government and industry, are afraid for their lives and livelihoods. Just yesterday, it emerged that that violence had surged by 80 percent last month, when compared to January.
    Ayad Jamal Aldin - leader of Ahrar 374 - said today, "It is clear what is happening here; the government is attempting to bully the people away from the ballot box. We should not accept it. Where we see these bullying tactics, we must see them for what they really are: an attempt to divert the Iraqi people's focus from the government's chronic failure to deliver jobs, running water and real security."
    "The only answer can be to stand up to bullies. And this week, we have the best possible response to them - to take part in this election and vote for change."
    For further information, contact:
    Ahrar Media Bureau
    Tel: +964 (0)790 157 4478 / +964 (0)790 157 4479 / +964 (0)771 275 2942
    press@ahrarparty.com
    About Ayad Jamal Aldin:
    Ayad Jamal Aldin is a cleric, best known for his consistent campaigning for a new, secular Iraq. He first rose to prominence at the Nasiriyah conference in March 2003, shortly before the fall of Saddam, where he called for a state free of religion, the turban and other theological symbols. In 2005, he was elected as one of the 25 MPs on the Iraqi National List, but withdrew in 2009 after becoming disenchanted with Iyad Allawi's overtures to Iran. He wants complete independence from Iranian interference in Iraq. He now leads the Ahrar party for the 2010 election to the Council of Representatives, to clean up corruption and create a strong, secure and liberated Iraq for the future.




    So that's background on the person speaking.

    He did believe in democracy and that it was possible in Iraq.

    He no longer does.

    The 2010 elections saw him split from Iraqiya.  Iraqiya won those elections.  Ayad Allwi should have been prime minister.  But Nouri al-Maliki refused to step down.  For eight months plus he refused to step down.  Instead of sticking with the Iraqi voters, US President Barack Obama overthrew the results with The Erbil Agreement (legal contract giving Nouri a second term).

    It's hilarious to watch Hillary's Temple Prostitutes insist -- with no evidence at all -- that Russia 'hacked' the US presidential election.  It's also a grave hypocrisy because Barack and Secretary of State Hillary tossed aside the Iraqi people's vote in 2010.

    So, nearly 14 years after the illegal war began, there are no WMDs, there is no democracy and the war continues.




  • Iraqi Sunni refugee طفل عراقي سني نزح مع عائلته من الموصل خوفا من جرائم الحكومة الشيعيه الطائفيه بوجهه تعابير ماجرى لنا من ضدنا




  • Iraqi Sunni baby with his family fled from For fear ofShia militias backed by Iraqi Gov. In his face expressions of our tragedy💔💔💔









    And that so-called liberation of Mosul continues -- creating thousands of refugees.

    It's day 67 of the slog.

    No end in sight.


    Iraqi Sunnis refugee طفل عراقي سني الحشد والده وتركه بالعراء يقول امنيتي بفراش دافىء وملابس تحميني من البرد انا واختي 😭😭😭



    Iraqi Sunni child fled from he says I hope Warm bed winter clothes For Me and my sister's Our Father dead 😭😿💋💋






    Hayder al-Abadi oversaw the liberation of Falluja too.

    It's still a ghost town.

    How sad that the rah-rah US press is so quick to move on to the newest 'liberation' but so uninterested in what happened last go round.


    Over 106,000 people have been displaced by the military operations in – many of them are .










  • residents caught between war and peace






    As the United States looks away . . .


    Mortar fire kills 11 people, including four aid workers, in Iraq's Mosul: UN



    Hospitals crowded with people wounded in Iraq's Mosul as battle to retake the city drags on by






    This morning, the US Defense Dept announced:


    Strikes in Iraq
    Attack, bomber, fighter, remotely piloted and rotary wing aircraft and rocket artillery conducted nine strikes in Iraq, coordinated with and in support of Iraq’s government:

    -- Near Bashir, a strike engaged an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed a tactical vehicle.

    -- Near Haditha, a strike destroyed an ISIL vehicle bomb, two vehicles and a supply cache.

    -- Near Mosul, five strikes engaged an ISIL tactical unit; destroyed two vehicles, a building, two tunnels and an ISIL command and control headquarters; and damaged a supply route.

    -- Near Rawah, a strike engaged an ISIL tactical unit, destroyed a building and suppressed a vehicle bomb.

    -- Near Sinjar, a strike destroyed an ISIL tank.


    Task force officials define a strike as one or more kinetic events that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative, effect. Therefore, officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIL vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against buildings, vehicles and weapon systems in a compound, for example, having the cumulative effect of making those targets harder or impossible for ISIL to use. Accordingly, officials said, they do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target. Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike.



    The following community sites -- plus THE GUARDIAN and Jody Watley -- updated:
























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